Thursday Apr. 17, 2014
Comments on:
Auschwitz survivor relates her experience
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By MiloJR on 05-23-11 @ 5:21 am
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And yet the hateful morons deny this ever happened…
By Gary on 05-25-11 @ 9:15 am
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Wow, What a great industry the holocaust has become. I was shocked to find out it is one of the wolds most profitable subjects. Some survivors writing up to 15 books about the holocaust and their experiences at age 1-5. Their memories so fresh.  For an event they all want to forget, they all seam to find the talking circuit. i think the biggest problems I find is, if all the women and children were separated and gassed upon arrival, how is it there are so many hundreds of these survivors out there talking, all claiming one to three years interned. Something just does not add up. After her talk I did some research and found many of her claims were not possible. Has any one checked out her story. We were already duped by three other so called survivors here in Montana in the last two years. My uncle went to one of those liberated camps in 1944 and made this comment in a journal after the war of his wartime experiences as a camera man for the army. “Ike ordered us to not film most of the camps inhabitants due to their healthy appearance. We were to only film those suffering the effects of disease. We used tractors to dig up bodies and move those that died from disease into piles. We used hoses and tractors to big up the grass so as to give it a muddy barren place. This will be a very useful propaganda film for the homefront.”
By West Valley on 05-25-11 @ 9:48 am
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I just wanted to update everyone on my education background, after 2nd grade I decided that I already knew everything that there was to know, and from that point on my Uncle did all of my edumacation.  After all he did write in his journal after the war.  My next posting will be on how we faked the moon landing. Thanks -Gary-
By Gary on 05-25-11 @ 2:32 pm
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West Valley, I was there in 44 and I am living here in the Kalispell area I earned doctorates in science from Munich University and in medicine from Frankfurt University.  In 1942 I received my medical degree and joined the SS. I was a Doctor at one of the camps known today as Auschwitz. In reality it was many camps that made up the complex; Auschwitz I (the Stammlager or base camp); Auschwitz II–Birkenau (the Vernichtungslager or extermination camp); Auschwitz III–Monowitz, also known as Buna–Monowitz (a labor camp); and 45 satellite camps. We operated from May 1940–January 1945 The Hungarians Jews were sent to Birkenau. The first two trains with a total of 3,800 Hungarian Jews reached Birkenau on May 2, 1944. In 44 we had a total of 200,00 Jews in the complex. 100,000 died in 8 months from disease and as a result of allied bombing. By late 44 our rail line was gone due to bombing. This left only 100.000 Jews in the complex. With the camp in its final moths of operation and the condition of German forces at this time, It would have been impossible to kill that many Jews that were supposed to have passed through the camp during that 7 1/2 months. After the war Poland built a museum and gift shop on the site of Auschwitz I and II, which by 1994 had seen 22 million visitors—700,000 annually—pass through the gates.
By Gary on 05-25-11 @ 2:42 pm
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I guess I failed to mention I married an American Red Cross worker, and the man I call uncle was her uncle. He was a great man and very honorable. He was with a Army film crew and was 42 in 1944. I met him when we moved to Chicago in 1953 he died in 1970. My English was not good enough to call him Thomas, so we called him uncle T.
By kalispelling bee on 05-25-11 @ 4:05 pm
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Balderdash. Thomas was one of the most common male German names in the 1950s. Its English pronunciation is almost identical to the German pronunciation of Toe-mahs.
By Gunter B on 05-25-11 @ 5:06 pm
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It is obvious how Amerika got the image of know it alls. So much they talk of subjects they have no knowledge of. Thomas; AHM-?s (English), TOM-?s (English), to-MA (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)  Greek form of the Aramaic name ????????? (Ta’oma’) which meant “twin”. In the New Testament this was the name of the apostle who initially doubted the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It was rarely used in Germany until the Amerikanization following the war. The letters TH are very difficult for Germans even to this day. book of names 1955; THOMAS   m   English, French, Dutch, Scandinavian, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name ????????? (Ta’oma’) which means “twin” Most common mens names to this day- REINHARD,  CHRISTOPH, Hans, CLAUS, DIEDERICH, JOHANN, JÜRGEN.
By kalispelling bee on 05-25-11 @ 6:17 pm
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Sorry, dude. The name Thomas was the 21st most popular male name in Germany in the Middle Ages. It was still popular by 1927 and made the hit parade of most popular German first names by the 1930s. When this guy is saying he couldn’t pronounce it, it was the sixth most popular name in Germany (1950-1959). German first names are not something you can bluff about, because the country has specific rules for allowable first names. Nice try, though.

www.beliebte-vornamen.de (That means beloved or popular first names, for the record).
By halcyonkayak on 05-25-11 @ 8:23 pm
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Wow, Gary.  I’d have to say I’m a little incredulous about many of your statements.  You did some research and found many of her claims not possible?  Which claims?  What was the nature of your research?  Then in your next post you claim to have been there after having earned a medical degree as a member of the SS.  You must be in your 90s for those things to be true.  If you have such an interesting counter-story to tell complete with documentation from a journal, you should educate the rest of us about it beyond posting on the Flathead Beacon blog.

Or maybe you are just making things up. 

I suspect the latter.

Follow up with convincing details, please. 

I am most interested in which parts of Mrs. Ban’s story you claim are not possible.
By halcyonkayak on 05-25-11 @ 8:26 pm
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By the way….....

When was your uncle at one of the camps?  1944?  Not possible.
By Gunter B on 05-25-11 @ 9:17 pm
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The first camps were liberated in 1944 curious how you decided his statement is not possible. i think after doing the math he would be 89 or 90, only a year or two older then the speaker. If I am correct he was also at the library for the films. He was there with a body guard. He is an old man. Also remember German schools are very different than our schools so if he was 21 or 22 in 1942 it would make him about 90 or 91. About right if it’s who I think it is. Now to my point, The site of German names supports my statement. Thomas did not become a common name until 1947.  During the years of occupation by the united states thousands of marriages took place between German women and American men, this is why there was a huge jump in certain names like Thomas. Germany also had years of occupation through out history, and those countries would cause periodic spikes of some names. Today Germany is home to many Turkish people so there is a spike of Turkish names in Germany but not by the Germans.
By GATEKEEPER on 05-26-11 @ 4:56 am
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Just ignore the revisionists! Like a bad case of the piles they just won’t go away. Dropped on their heads as babies I suspect….....
By Big Bob on 05-26-11 @ 7:12 am
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I’d like to ignore them but the give me great cause for concern. I met some of these people at Red’s last year after the Library films. The men I met were not the ones showing the films, but were a group of former Nazi’s living here in the Flathead. I talked for an hour with a couple of them and later a story in the Beacon had statements from one of them in their story about the films. These are not the White Supremacists like April Gatie, their group is a well known group run by Himmler’s daughter and other former Nazi SS men and their families. They call themselves Stille Hilfe (Silent aid) and have an off shoot called The Children of the SS. They have been here for years now living in the shadows. After talking with a couple of these people it became evident they are hard core Nazi’s and their group is being run and includes many former SS men. Their were about 30 of them at their table at Red’s last year. They are all German and speak often in German around the table, they are not American Neo Nazi’s. Why are they in Kalispell?
By Big Saul on 05-29-11 @ 5:44 pm
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So it never happened heh? Here’s from Wikipedea:
Auschwitz (German: Konzentrationslager Auschwitz [?a??v?ts]  ( listen)) or Auschwitz Birkenau German Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp (1940–1945),[1] was a network of Nazi German concentration and extermination camps built and operated by the Third Reich in Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany during World War II. It was the largest of the German concentration camps, consisting of Auschwitz I (the Stammlager or base camp); Auschwitz II–Birkenau (the Vernichtungslager or extermination camp); Auschwitz III–Monowitz, also known as Buna–Monowitz (a labor camp); and 45 satellite camps.[2]

Auschwitz had for a long time been a German name for O?wi?cim, the town by and around which the camps were located; the name “Auschwitz” was made the official name again by the Germans after they invaded Poland in September 1939. Birkenau, the German translation of Brzezinka (birch tree), refers to a small Polish village nearby that was mostly destroyed by the Germans to make way for the camp.

Auschwitz II–Birkenau was designated by the Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler, Germany’s Minister of the Interior, as the place of the “final solution of the Jewish question in Europe”. From spring 1942 until the fall of 1944, transport trains delivered Jews to the camp’s gas chambers from all over Nazi-occupied Europe.[3] The camp’s first commandant, Rudolf Höss, testified after the war at the Nuremberg Trials that up to three million people had died there (2.5 million gassed, and 500,000 from disease and starvation),[4] a figure since revised to 1.1 million, around 90 percent of them Jews.[5][6] Others deported to Auschwitz included 150,000 Poles, 23,000 Roma and Sinti, 15,000 Soviet prisoners of war, and tens of thousands of people of diverse nationalities.[7] Those not killed in the gas chambers died of starvation, forced labor, lack of disease control, individual executions, and medical experiments.[8]

On January 27, 1945, Auschwitz was liberated by Soviet troops, a day commemorated around the world as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. In 1947, Poland founded a museum on the site of Auschwitz I and II, which by 1994 had seen 22 million visitors—700,000 annually—pass through the iron gates crowned with the infamous motto, Arbeit macht frei (“work makes you free”).

My father was one of the first American soldiers to enter the camp after liberation and could hardly talk about what he saw. Yes sir, It MOST DEFINITELY HAPPENED!
By Old Salt on 05-29-11 @ 8:01 pm
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“Don’t ever believe it can’t happen here.” 

Those are words that have haunted me for forty plus years when I met Pastor Max and he explained how it was to grow up in Germany as the Nazi’s took power and did their mischief.

Like their current counterparts, they were bullies and thugs who managed to swing the power structure of their country by charismatic demonstrations and constantly repeating the “Big Lies”. 

He told of being part of the “Hitler Youth” and that there was much peer pressure that made it attractive.  He eventually became disilusioned when he realized how hollow it was, a superficial facade that masked its anti semitic and racist core.

He told of being drafted into the German army, listening to the patriotic songs, watching the pagentry.  It was easy to become caught up in the tragic flood even though the underlying power structure was rotten to its core.

Germany didn’t develop a morally corrupt system of genocide overnight.  That would be too simple an explanation.  Like what’s happening here now, it was eroded bit by bit until Hitler’s henchmen could grab power and murder millions.  I’m not even going to entertain the silly revisionist denials that it happened.  It did, face it and move forward.

As Pastor Max told me:
“Don’t ever believe it can’t happen here.”
By Old Salt on 05-29-11 @ 8:37 pm
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Moosebozo,

Your arguments are so refreshingly repetitive.  And consistently vapid. 

Do you not have enough of an intelect to put forward a reasoned sentence?
By Mark W. on 05-29-11 @ 9:23 pm
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Let’s not forget!

The central episode of suffering for the Christian is Christ’s death on the Cross, not the Holocaust!  Let’s maintain some perspective, mmmkay?
By Mark W. on 05-30-11 @ 12:37 pm
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If half of the Christian Ziokooks shed a tenth of the amount of sweat thinking about the suffering of Christ as they did thinking about the suffering of the Jews during the Holocaust, the world would be a far better place.  But that actually takes a modicum of spiritual fortitude, something nobody has ever gone broke betting Amerikans having a lack of. 

Divorce, abortion, Holocaust.  Amen.
By Old Salt on 05-30-11 @ 3:01 pm
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Aside from the fact that many nazi’s went (go) to church after committing atrocities and spouting racist smack, Christ has very little to do with this conversation.
 
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